Appreciating the beauty of london in composed upon westminster bridge september 3 1802 by william wo

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Appreciating the beauty of london in composed upon westminster bridge september 3 1802 by william wo

KCW Today June by Kensington, Chelsea & Westminster Today - Issuu

Westminster Bridge at sunrise. Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty; This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.

The river glideth at his own sweet will: If the facts of commerce and empire were ugly, their machinery could still be picturesque, and the environmental and social damage invisible.

This is a poem which both tells and shows. The interlocking devices of the Petrarchan form allow a seamless movement between remonstration lines one to three and nine to 11 and demonstration.

A shade cunningly, he flavours his urban scene with rural qualities: Line 10, risking the blatant comparison, evokes a Lake District sunrise. And this is how the elated poet achieves a compromise, and the argument with his inner Dorothy is resolved.

Why did this block occur?

London has justified the Romantic vision only in a state of suspended animation, imagined not merely asleep, but lying in heart-stilled death.

On the occasion recollected in this sonnet, William and Dorothy were headed for Calais. This is not to trivialise the poem but to seek a richer source for its combined rhetorical insistence and its visual and tactile delicacy.

There may well be two women sitting next to Wordsworth in his wonderful stagecoach of a sonnet — the thoroughly-present Dorothy and the imagined, haunting figure of Annette.The so-called "penny steamers" of London, which run, during the summer months, at very cheap rates between London Bridge and Chelsea, form the best way of seeing and appreciating the vast city.

Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, topic" Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, " is a Petrarchan sonnet by William Wordsworth describing London and the River Thames, viewed from Westminster Bridge in the early morning.

page 1 the novels and novelists of the eighteenth century., in illustration of the manners and morals of the age.

by william forsyth, m. a., q.c., author of "the life of cicero," "case3 and opinions on constitutional law," etc., etc.; late fellow of trinity college, cambridge. Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, would he be of soul who could pass by.

A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear. The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, By William Wordsworth.

NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW AND MISCELLANEOUS JOURNAL. the celebrated men I have just named. Without them, we should now have spoken an unintelligible jargon.

Appreciating the beauty of london in composed upon westminster bridge september 3 1802 by william wo

These kinds of beauty were lost upon M. de Fontenelle. What was sim- J)le, natural, and truly sublime, did not affect him it was a language he did not understand. Wo to ihat people. Full text of "Select poems from Coleridge and Wordsworth: prescribed for university and normal school entrance examinations, " See other formats.

Full text of "Notes and Queries"